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North End Boston

I visited Boston for the first time in 2019 and it was love at first sight (and taste)! I stayed in the North End for only 3 nights and it was not nearly enough time to explore all the excellent restaurants, delis, shops and supermarkets. The North End of Boston is famous for being an authentic Italian neighborhood and I was only too happy to indulge in their cuisine. Mangia mangia! I made this map to help me remember some of the wonderful food I enjoyed during my short-but-sweet stay in Beantown. I didn’t have enough room to include all the foods I sampled (for example, the lobster rolls, yum!) but it’s a pretty good summary. This is the first illustrated map I created using Procreate — there was a lot of learning and trial-and-error in this project but I had great fun putting it all together.
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Sunken Cities

This world map is illustrated with artifacts or ruins found at archaeological sites of cities through antiquity that have been lost to the waves. Whether by earthquake, volcano, rising sea levels or some other cataclysm, countless waterfront towns, villages and metropolises around the globe have sunk to a watery grave. I made this map for a call for maps for a new atlas by Guerrilla Cartography (their mission is to widely promote the cartographic arts and facilitate an expansion of the art, methods, and thematic scope of cartography, through collaborative projects, hosting theme-based community workshops and symposiums, and mounting public exhibitions). According to GC, Shelter: An Atlas endeavors to map shelter in its myriad contexts and conditions and at all scales of research and geography. I conducted extensive online research for this map, and due to restrictions on space I had to leave out a number of other sites that I learned about. The illustrations were created in Procreate for iPad and the main map was assembled and typeset in Photoshop. It is my hope that my map will be accepted by GC for publication in the new atlas. If so, I’ll be sure to post an update about that!
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The Great Lakes

The Milwaukee County Historical Society is preparing for a new major exhibit about the Great Lakes and Milwaukee’s role as a “Water Centric City.” When they needed quality, custom-made maps to display in their interpretive exhibits, they asked if I could help. These are among a series of 10 maps I was commissioned to make for this exhibition (due to open in January 2021 and running through 2022). Among the Great Lakes maps I created were: Great Lakes Basin…Wisconsin’s Diversion Dilemma…Wisconsin’s recent glaciation…Wisconsin’s Ecological Landscapes….Invasive Mussels…and Great Lakes in profile. Though these maps are not really “illustrated maps” — but rather designed to be more educational, museum-style — they were no less fun to work on! No matter what the style, I love making maps. And these were especially enjoyable, as I have lived next to Lake Michigan most of my life.
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Shipwreck Coast II

This is a fresh update of my first Shipwreck Coast map, which was published in a magazine in 2017. This newly revised map does a much better job of showing why  this 80-miles stretch of Michigan’s northern shore earned it’s other chilling moniker: “Graveyard of the Great Lakes.” Since around 1836 over 600 ships and their crew have vanished beneath the waves, from any one or more of the hazards of sailing on Lake Superior. All of the Great Lakes have seen an extraordinary share of wrecks — some experts put the total at upwards of 10,000 — but conditions on Lake Superior are the worst of them all, particularly in the fall. I think this revision my Shipwreck Coast map offers a more complete perspective of this region. and maybe sparks renewed interest in the maritime history of Lake Superior and it’s victims.
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Hats of the World

I’ve always been captivated by hats and caps. There is so much diversity throughout history and time and cultures! Originally hats were worn for protection from the elements, most notably the sun/heat, precipitation and cold. But they have been used for so many other functions, such as for ceremonies and fashion. They developed into important symbols of status and class. And they evolved with a wide variety of jobs and occupations. For this project I chose 29 hats and caps from around the globe; they should be recognizable to most people. I tried to position them close to the country of origin or popularity, or at least near where the particular hat is commonly worn. I chose: Trapper hat Western Fedora Baseball cap Sombrero Trilby Panama Rasta cap Cadet cap Chullo Bolero Flat cap Tam O’Shanter Bowler Beret Alpine Fiddler Toque Fez Pith helmet Kufi Kippah Cossack Urshanka Sherpa Dastar Boonie Slouch Rice hat This is a personal project created using Procreate for iPad and Adobe Photoshop.
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Georgetown, Texas

Georgetown, Texas is a charming little town just north of Austin. A realtor in the area hired me to design a map for their website which would highlight 4 new residential complexes, while also pointing out some of the local “flavor” within walking distance — bars, restaurants, walk/bike paths,  parks, library, grocery, etc. Initially they were just going to place a Google map on the web page, but that was rather bland, boring and lacked any personality. My map is colorful, focused and gives the map a bit of life that engages the viewer and, hopefully, helps sell some properties. Check it out here!
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Midwest Muslim

I was asked to create a pair of maps for a new book from celebrated author Edward E. Curtis IV, titled Muslims of the Heartland: How Syrian Immigrants Made a Home in the American West. The book tells the story of how the first two generations of Syrian Muslim Midwesterners created a life that was Arab, Muslim, and American, all at the same time. It also shows what the land — its fields, creeks, and lakes — meant to their lives. This colorful map features illustrations and locations that are central to the stories in the book. UPDATE: NYUPress chose to use my map on the cover of the book. It can be ordered here.
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Lebanon/Syria

This is my first grayscale map, created for a book project by professor and author Edward E. Curtis IV. The book, Heartland Muslim: A Syrian History of the Midwest (NYU Press) will feature another of my maps, also grayscale. Mass market books with maps or other illustrations typically require the art in grayscale format, to save in printing costs. I enjoyed the process of creating a map without color and I look forward to doing more very soon!
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Global Offices

An accounting  firm approached me to create a series of maps showing the location of their different offices around the globe — nearly 60 in total! The maps needed to be on-brand regarding colors and type, with some freedom in the style and treatment of the maps themselves.
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Birding in the USA

This illustrated map was created for a jigsaw puzzle for the True South Puzzle Company, based in Tennessee. The project called for including birds, birders, bird feeders, bird houses and birding hotspots throughout all 50 states. This project was great fun for me, as I am an avid birder, former bird owner, ornithologist and bird keeper at several zoos. You can order this puzzle here!
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Campbell Island

Motu Ihupuku is the indigenous Maori name for the island more commonly known as Campbell Island. It is an uninhabited subantarctic island of New Zealand. In 1863 a small schooner named Grafton was hired by a group of traders from Sydney, Australia. Their goal was sail to Campbell Island to prospect for tin and attempt some sealing. Frustrated and disappointed by the lack of both, they decided to head home, stopping by the Auckland Islands on the way in hopes of better luck. Their story is brilliantly told by Joan Druett in her 2019 book, The Island of the Lost. Her book does not contain a map of the Grafton’s first stop, so I decided to make one myself. A companion map of Auckland Island is next. This map shows the sailors’ route, as well as some of the native flora and fauna they encountered. I included the location of “The World’s Lonliest Tree”, aka the Ranfurly Tree — it is a Sitka spruce, reportedly over 170 mi away from any other tree, making it the most isolated and remote tree in the world.  
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Crystal Lake WI

The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service in Wisconsin is actively working with private landowners to create suitable habitats for the Henslow’s sparrow and the Karner blue butterfly, both endangered species. In the process, water in lakes and rivers are getting cleaner with less agricultural runoff and greater natural filtration. This map was created to help show how water from Crystal Lake ends up in Lake Michigan. Endangered birds and butterflies are slowly coming back to these restored areas.
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Green Bay, WI

Life & Culture magazine is a digital publication of the Life Church of Green Bay, Wisconsin. They approached me to create this illustrated map for the cover of their August 2021 issue.
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Hiking in the USA

This is the second in a 4-part series of puzzles I created for the True South Puzzle Company, based in Tennessee. It shows the routes of various long-distance hiking trails that wind through all 50 states. The National Park Service states the National Scenic Trails system “are routes of outstanding recreation opportunity intended to showcase our country’s spectacular natural resources and beauty. These routes are primarily non-motorized continuous trail and extend for 100 miles or more. The routes traverse beautiful terrain, and connect communities, significant landmarks and public lands.” There are 11 National Scenic Trails, totaling 24,600 miles, within the National Trails System. There are also plenty of National Historic and Recreation Trails to enjoy.
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Fishing in the USA

My latest puzzle map — third in a series — for True South Puzzle Company. Features of this map include: 6 popular (and really pretty) game fish species, fish labeled with common names, 20 well-known fishing spots around the country, and 8 fishing styles represented.
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Milwaukee County Zoo

It was great fun to work on this map for my former employer, Milwaukee County Zoo! They approached me to help them create a guest map for their Wild Lights event: “This winter experience will be the first of its kind as the zoo transforms into a wonderful world of color that offers moments of surprise and delight around every corner.” This map shows the one-way path around the zoo and is color-coded to match the name of each unique zone. Guest services and concession stands are also shown to help visitors know what to expect and where to find various amenities.  
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Oak Park, Illinois

Downtown Oak Park commissioned me to redesign their visitor map which is displayed in various kiosks around town (previous map shown below). Locals and newcomers alike will benefit from getting an updated overview of the various cafes and restaurants, stores and shops, spas and salons, banks, apartments, cleaners, yoga & pilate studios, etc. found throughout the small, quaint downtown district. Oak Park is a community less than 10 mi west of Chicago, known for its exceptional array of shops, restaurants, state of the art seven-screen movie theater and an exciting year-round schedule of promotions and special events. Oh, and it’s also the birthplace of Ernest Hemingway and home studio of Frank Lloyd Wright. This map will be overlaid with number- and color-coded circles which will correspond with a legend of all the various locations.
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